The year in images: an arbit thought.

Consider this.
The Board of Governors (BoG) of the KVS headed by HRD Minister Smriti Irani decided that teaching of
German language as an option to Sanskrit will be discontinued herewith.
I will come back to this later, but I have to admit, the accompanying image did morph the first thoughts that would have come to my mind, rather, even aggrandize my negative vouch towards the decision.
Although the media's usage of a news image has been widely discussed and reiterating it would not add substance to the agreed upon notion, I would like to add that more than the authenticity or correct usage of an image, the selection also creates subtle biases in the reader's perceptions.
Here's another viral hashtag from 2014, #IfTheyGunnedMedown, which asks which picture would the media use owing to the racial prejudice in the society?


The selection of one of these two images creates two whole parallel universes wherein even an unbiased reader may tilt towards where the editor is steering him or her to. Coming back to my arbitrary speculation, do you think the following image would have made a difference in how we judged her decision as dictated by the news piece?

The Board of Governors (BoG) of the KVS headed by HRD Minister Smriti Irani decided that teaching of 
German language as an option to Sanskrit will be discontinued herewith.
Or, maybe, it is entirely something else. Be it the utterly appalling comeback of Bombay Times on how it leered Padukone on a public platform, or the ridicules Irani faced since she was a television actress. Plus, we've had many uneducated ministers and politicians in the past as well. People see what they want to. They like what they wish would have been.All this, in view of all the information flooding our internet, and equipped with ease of access; we often see the popular stuff more than the true stuff. Personal example- I had added an underwater hotel in Fiji as a to-be-visited place until I realized yesterday that it does not exist.
2014 saw a plethora of images that were totally fake, but led to believe otherwise.



Hilariously enough, even Google makes mistakes, such as misrepresenting Kim Jong-un's sister with a spoof image. As if we already didn't have enough with Sony's The Interview in 2014. Hope this goof-up goes internationally uncontroversial. As a closing reminiscent note, have a look at TIME's 100 photos of 2014.




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